If you want more context on the vehicle's selling price, Edmunds can help with its True Market Value tool. You'll get an idea of what people are paying for vehicles that are similarly equipped to the one you're considering, and it's a good reference point for negotiations. Edmunds also has a tool to help you appraise your potential trade-in to determine if you might trade it in or sell it on your own.

Don't stress out over a little bit of haggling. If you've done your homework on the car, you will have the information you need to negotiate. You should be able to determine a fair price for the car you've settled on by appraising the vehicle and getting its True Market Value (TMV®), also known as the average price paid for the vehicle in your area. Make sure you input the correct miles and choose the applicable options. Edmunds' TMV tool will show you what you can expect to pay for the vehicle, depending on whether the seller is a private party or a dealership. You'll also get the car's estimated trade-in value. Consider printing a copy of the TMV and bringing it with you to help wrap up the deal.
Cons: While buying new might be the most satisfying way to buy a car, it's also the most expensive. Some cars depreciate faster than others, but no matter what you're buying, your new car is going to experience depreciation the minute you drive it off the lot. That's not to say buying a new car isn't a good value, but it's a financial hit you should keep in mind if you're shopping for a new car. Consider doing a little homework on the depreciation rate of the car you have your eye on before pulling the trigger.
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