To date, Nissan has only shown a prototype of the redesigned Z sports car, which is rumored to carry 400Z nomenclature. That name would be derived from its twin-turbocharged V6 engine, which is expected to make 400 horsepower. In any case, the new Nissan Z blends heritage design cues and a familiar shape with modern performance and technology. And yes, a manual gearbox is planned.
What is a new car model? New car models wear nameplates that either didn’t exist before or are resurrected from the past. Examples among 2021 model-year vehicles include the Kia Seltos, a new nameplate, and the Ford Bronco, a resurrected nameplate. Sometimes, a new model is based on an existing vehicle but has a dramatically different mission, such as the new Ram 1500 TRX or the Volvo XC40 Recharge P8.
The next thing to do is get an idea of maintenance costs on any car you're considering. Proper maintenance is especially important on a used car since it may not have a warranty to protect it if anything breaks down. People buy used vehicles as a way to save money but often overlook the cost of maintenance, which might end up pushing them beyond the limits of their budget. The car's owner's manual, which is often available online, will tell you what you need to know about maintenance services and intervals. A phone call to a dealership service department or a trusted independent repair shop will get you pricing information. You also can check resources such as RepairPal.
Like Carvana, CarMax offers a wide selection of new and used vehicles at fixed, no-haggle prices. The company has both curbside pickup and home delivery services in many locations. The site makes it simple to find different autos by make, model, features, mileage and number of previous owners. Vehicle history reports are provided through AutoCheck.
Don't stress out over a little bit of haggling. If you've done your homework on the car, you will have the information you need to negotiate. You should be able to determine a fair price for the car you've settled on by appraising the vehicle and getting its True Market Value (TMV®), also known as the average price paid for the vehicle in your area. Make sure you input the correct miles and choose the applicable options. Edmunds' TMV tool will show you what you can expect to pay for the vehicle, depending on whether the seller is a private party or a dealership. You'll also get the car's estimated trade-in value. Consider printing a copy of the TMV and bringing it with you to help wrap up the deal.
When shopping at a CarMax store, simply tell a sales associate that you'd like to take the car of your choice for a 24-hour test drive. You’ll be asked to provide a valid driver's license, verifiable comprehensive and collision coverage, and to return the car to the same store on the next business day. Please note, there is a 150-mile limit for 24-hour test drives and the car’s condition must remain consistent with when it left the store.
CarFax is well known for providing comprehensive vehicle history reports that detail all previous damage and ownership history. It works with over 28,000 dealerships nationwide to sell a variety of used cars. You can sign up for alerts on recalls and necessary maintenance reminders to make sure your car is in tip-top shape. The accompanying mobile app receives strong reviews from users.

If you want more context on the vehicle's selling price, Edmunds can help with its True Market Value tool. You'll get an idea of what people are paying for vehicles that are similarly equipped to the one you're considering, and it's a good reference point for negotiations. Edmunds also has a tool to help you appraise your potential trade-in to determine if you might trade it in or sell it on your own.
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