If you want more context on the vehicle's selling price, Edmunds can help with its True Market Value tool. You'll get an idea of what people are paying for vehicles that are similarly equipped to the one you're considering, and it's a good reference point for negotiations. Edmunds also has a tool to help you appraise your potential trade-in to determine if you might trade it in or sell it on your own.
If you are financing the vehicle, it is a good idea to get preapproved for a loan. This way you'll know your purchasing budget and the interest rate for which you qualify. Some lenders won't offer a loan if the vehicle is passed a certain age or if it has too many miles. The limitations will vary by lender. In this case, your next move might be to apply for a personal loan. Just be aware that those interest rates are typically higher than for auto loans.

Buying a used car is one of the smartest financial decisions you can make. You pay less for the automobile and avoid the depreciation that new-car buyers face the moment the vehicle rolls off the dealer's lot. Buying used has a number of other advantages as well. You will pay less for registration and insurance. Also, the margin for a discount may be greater when you buy a pre-owned automobile. And if you purchase the vehicle from a private party, you will likely get an even better price than you would at a dealership.
When the time comes to close the used-car sale, there are a few important items to take care of. Have the seller get a smog test for the car if your state requires one. Check the registration to ensure it is current. Make sure the seller gives you the title (also called a "pink slip"). If the owner still owes money on the vehicle, you may have to contact his or her bank or credit union to complete the transfer of ownership. Some states require the seller and buyer to complete a bill of sale. This document is good to have in case you are pulled over and haven't yet registered the vehicle. To prevent any hassles like that in the first place, go to the Department of Motor Vehicles as soon as possible to register the vehicle in your name and pay any appropriate taxes.
A redesigned Audi A3 and Audi S3 are coming to the U.S., but it appears the vehicles are delayed until the first half of 2021, which means they’ll likely be 2022s. In any case, when the new car makes its way to the States it will have appealing new styling, an upgraded interior with new tech, and an electrified powertrain for improved performance and efficiency.
Most private sellers aren't as experienced in negotiating as dealers, nor do they want to negotiate as car dealerships do. Use this to your advantage and make a fair but aggressive offer. If the seller turns it down, be persistent and counter with a slightly higher amount. Remember, it might be OK to spend a little more than you'd hoped if you found the perfect used car.
Volkswagen has rapidly improved its SUV game in recent years, rolling out the Atlas, Atlas Cross Sport, and redesigned Tiguan in the sizes, shapes, and flavors that Americans prefer. Soon, the 2022 Volkswagen Taos joins the roster, a small SUV about the size of a Kia Seltos – and the original Tiguan. Turbocharged power, a roomy interior, and classic VW driving dynamics are hallmarks of the new 2022 Taos. 
Minivans might be down, but they’re not out. And after letting a decade pass without a redesign, the 2021 Toyota Sienna is all-new for the year. Bold in terms of style, Toyota takes a different path in terms of powertrain, making all Siennas fuel-efficient hybrids. All-wheel drive remains available, and Toyota packs the new Sienna with lots of family-friendly features.

Infiniti hopes the new 2022 QX55 will remind people of the original FX35, but there isn’t much tying the two models together aside from a fastback roofline and the automaker’s endless highway logo. The QX55 is basically a QX50 with less interior room, Infiniti applying the same recipe to its compact crossover that BMW and Mercedes-Benz do to theirs (and now Audi, too). As is true of other SUV “coupes,” you’ll pay more for less with the Infiniti QX55.
Most private sellers aren't as experienced in negotiating as dealers, nor do they want to negotiate as car dealerships do. Use this to your advantage and make a fair but aggressive offer. If the seller turns it down, be persistent and counter with a slightly higher amount. Remember, it might be OK to spend a little more than you'd hoped if you found the perfect used car.
Cons: While buying new might be the most satisfying way to buy a car, it's also the most expensive. Some cars depreciate faster than others, but no matter what you're buying, your new car is going to experience depreciation the minute you drive it off the lot. That's not to say buying a new car isn't a good value, but it's a financial hit you should keep in mind if you're shopping for a new car. Consider doing a little homework on the depreciation rate of the car you have your eye on before pulling the trigger.
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