Don't stress out over a little bit of haggling. If you've done your homework on the car, you will have the information you need to negotiate. You should be able to determine a fair price for the car you've settled on by appraising the vehicle and getting its True Market Value (TMV®), also known as the average price paid for the vehicle in your area. Make sure you input the correct miles and choose the applicable options. Edmunds' TMV tool will show you what you can expect to pay for the vehicle, depending on whether the seller is a private party or a dealership. You'll also get the car's estimated trade-in value. Consider printing a copy of the TMV and bringing it with you to help wrap up the deal.


When the time comes to close the used-car sale, there are a few important items to take care of. Have the seller get a smog test for the car if your state requires one. Check the registration to ensure it is current. Make sure the seller gives you the title (also called a "pink slip"). If the owner still owes money on the vehicle, you may have to contact his or her bank or credit union to complete the transfer of ownership. Some states require the seller and buyer to complete a bill of sale. This document is good to have in case you are pulled over and haven't yet registered the vehicle. To prevent any hassles like that in the first place, go to the Department of Motor Vehicles as soon as possible to register the vehicle in your name and pay any appropriate taxes.
While every effort has been made to ensure display of accurate data, the vehicle listings within this website may not reflect all accurate vehicle items. Accessories and color may vary. All inventory listed is subject to prior sale. The vehicle photo displayed may be an example only. Vehicle Photos may not match exact vehicles. Please confirm vehicle price with Dealership. See Dealership for details.
Once the internet manager or salesperson arrives at your home (if that's where you're taking delivery), review the contract. You don't have to read the whole thing, but do pay attention to such important details as the APR, total sale price, length of the contract, down payment, documentation fee and registration fees. Make sure your personal information is correct.

When you've found the exact vehicle you want, take the lowest price quote, then call or email the internet manager and make an offer. Even if you received a reasonable price right off the bat, don't be afraid to make a counteroffer for less. It's part of the process, and dealers understand that. Do make sure you stay in the pricing ballpark. Let the internet manager know you've received offers from other dealers and, if needed, refer to a specific quote if there's any reluctance to bring down the price.
Pros: Perhaps the most obvious pro of buying a new car is that you are the first owner. Buying new ensures you'll get the most possible life out of the car since it has almost no miles on it when you start driving it. Even the cleanest used cars can't be in as good of condition as a new car. If you're planning on keeping the car long-term, you can get a lot of years and a lot of miles out of your new car.New cars have excellent warranties that can give you peace of mind. Having your maintenance covered for a certain period ensures that you won't have to worry about maintenance for a while and by the time your warranty expires, you might want to trade-in for another car anyway.
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