Most private sellers aren't as experienced in negotiating as dealers, nor do they want to negotiate as car dealerships do. Use this to your advantage and make a fair but aggressive offer. If the seller turns it down, be persistent and counter with a slightly higher amount. Remember, it might be OK to spend a little more than you'd hoped if you found the perfect used car.
When the time comes to close the used-car sale, there are a few important items to take care of. Have the seller get a smog test for the car if your state requires one. Check the registration to ensure it is current. Make sure the seller gives you the title (also called a "pink slip"). If the owner still owes money on the vehicle, you may have to contact his or her bank or credit union to complete the transfer of ownership. Some states require the seller and buyer to complete a bill of sale. This document is good to have in case you are pulled over and haven't yet registered the vehicle. To prevent any hassles like that in the first place, go to the Department of Motor Vehicles as soon as possible to register the vehicle in your name and pay any appropriate taxes.

Pros: Perhaps the most obvious pro of buying a new car is that you are the first owner. Buying new ensures you'll get the most possible life out of the car since it has almost no miles on it when you start driving it. Even the cleanest used cars can't be in as good of condition as a new car. If you're planning on keeping the car long-term, you can get a lot of years and a lot of miles out of your new car.New cars have excellent warranties that can give you peace of mind. Having your maintenance covered for a certain period ensures that you won't have to worry about maintenance for a while and by the time your warranty expires, you might want to trade-in for another car anyway.
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