The used-car market is like a huge haystack, and while it may seem tough to find that needle, a bit of online research cuts the legwork and speeds up the process considerably. The good news is that you're already on the right page to start. From here, you can either input the car you want or scroll to the "Select a Make" section and click on an automaker you're interested in. You'll then get a list of cars to choose from. And on the left side of the inventory page, you'll find several ways to filter the choices.
What is a new car model? New car models wear nameplates that either didn’t exist before or are resurrected from the past. Examples among 2021 model-year vehicles include the Kia Seltos, a new nameplate, and the Ford Bronco, a resurrected nameplate. Sometimes, a new model is based on an existing vehicle but has a dramatically different mission, such as the new Ram 1500 TRX or the Volvo XC40 Recharge P8.
What is a substantially refreshed model? Substantially refreshed models are existing vehicles receiving significant engineering, design, or technology updates. Because complete redesigns cost a big pile of money, car companies sometimes take what is a fundamentally sound design and give it a major makeover. Think of it as the difference between rebuilding your home or remodeling it. Examples for 2021 include the the Lexus IS.
Don't stress out over a little bit of haggling. If you've done your homework on the car, you will have the information you need to negotiate. You should be able to determine a fair price for the car you've settled on by appraising the vehicle and getting its True Market Value (TMV®), also known as the average price paid for the vehicle in your area. Make sure you input the correct miles and choose the applicable options. Edmunds' TMV tool will show you what you can expect to pay for the vehicle, depending on whether the seller is a private party or a dealership. You'll also get the car's estimated trade-in value. Consider printing a copy of the TMV and bringing it with you to help wrap up the deal.

If you want more context on the vehicle's selling price, Edmunds can help with its True Market Value tool. You'll get an idea of what people are paying for vehicles that are similarly equipped to the one you're considering, and it's a good reference point for negotiations. Edmunds also has a tool to help you appraise your potential trade-in to determine if you might trade it in or sell it on your own.


Pros: Perhaps the most obvious pro of buying a new car is that you are the first owner. Buying new ensures you'll get the most possible life out of the car since it has almost no miles on it when you start driving it. Even the cleanest used cars can't be in as good of condition as a new car. If you're planning on keeping the car long-term, you can get a lot of years and a lot of miles out of your new car.New cars have excellent warranties that can give you peace of mind. Having your maintenance covered for a certain period ensures that you won't have to worry about maintenance for a while and by the time your warranty expires, you might want to trade-in for another car anyway.
×