With the redesigned 2022 Volkswagen Golf R, VW unleashes the most powerful Golf it has ever built. With 315 horsepower, standard torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, and a full hardware upgrade to support maximum performance, the new Golf R screams to 60 mph in a claimed 4.6 seconds and tops out at 155 mph. Best of all, it retains its stealthily anonymous design. Don’t look for massive air dams or giant wings here.
In addition to the new 2021 trucks listed below in alphabetical order, there is a long list of upcoming electric pickups on the way from a number of non-traditional electric vehicle companies. Those that appear close to production or have a realistic chance of reaching the end of an assembly line include the Bollinger B2, Lordstown Endurance, Nikola Badger, Rivian R1T, and Tesla Cybertruck. Chevrolet, Ford, and GMC are also planning electrified trucks in the near future, including a resurrection of the Hummer nameplate.

Volkswagen has rapidly improved its SUV game in recent years, rolling out the Atlas, Atlas Cross Sport, and redesigned Tiguan in the sizes, shapes, and flavors that Americans prefer. Soon, the 2022 Volkswagen Taos joins the roster, a small SUV about the size of a Kia Seltos – and the original Tiguan. Turbocharged power, a roomy interior, and classic VW driving dynamics are hallmarks of the new 2022 Taos. 


Cons: While buying new might be the most satisfying way to buy a car, it's also the most expensive. Some cars depreciate faster than others, but no matter what you're buying, your new car is going to experience depreciation the minute you drive it off the lot. That's not to say buying a new car isn't a good value, but it's a financial hit you should keep in mind if you're shopping for a new car. Consider doing a little homework on the depreciation rate of the car you have your eye on before pulling the trigger.
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